Technology That Targets Leaks

Leaks are often a major problem in the water industry since having a leak means that a valuable resource: water is being wasted, and customers’ will not get their regular supply of potable water, as well as, the fact that the surrounding infrastructure will be hampered.

However, in a recent article by Laura Sanchez, in the editor’s blog of the Water Efficiency Magazine, she looks at a robot designed by mechanical engineer You Wu, which is able to detect leaks in pipes even before they have become large enough to be noticed by customers and employees within the water sector, thus ensuring that the problem can be solved sooner rather than later.

“Daisy” as the robot is called also links to mapping software which would allow engineers to know exactly where the leaks are, in order to not to make any costly mistakes.

To read the entire article and make comments you can click on the following link There’s A Robot in Your Pipes…And its Wearing a Skirt

Smart Water Management

Water is a necessary resource and can often be described as life itself, since without water persons will not be able to survive. Yet, while such a resource is needed and is mainly provided by water management utilities, such organizations can employ technology and smart techniques to ensure smooth operations, which overall can lead to lower operational costs.

In a recent article published by Daniel P. Duffy, on 11 September, 2018, he highlights the basis of smart water management, such as Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) technologies and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems, and highlights what this entails and some relevant suppliers of the technology.

One can read the full article by clicking on the following link Intelligent Water Management

Does legal mean safe?

In a guest blog in the Water Efficiency Magazine Dr. Edo McGowan, who has forty years of experience in the development of local, regional, and international programs relating to health aspects of water quality, vector control, as well as, the analyses and disposal of hazardous materials, discusses the legality  of water compared to its safety, since there could be many new contaminants existing that may not be found in laboratory tests.

To read and comment on the article click the following Legal vs. Safe Water

Dealing with FOGs (Fats, Oils and Grease)

As employees working within the water sector, we at some point get to know about fats, oils and grease and the damage they can cause to pipes, whether it is through public education or getting our hands dirty when we have to deal with the clogs created by pouring these fats, oils and grease down the drain.

In a recent article by Laura Sanchez, the editor of the Water Efficiency Magazine, she highlights a new strategy for dealing with FOGs (fats, oil and grease) developed by a research team from the University of British Colombia in Canada.

To read the article and comment you can follow the link Fatberg to Fuel.

Do you think such a process can make a difference or is it just another pipe dream? 🙂

On the Pulse – Smart meters and acoustic sensors limit non-revenue water loss.

The town of Olds in Alberta, Canada, faced a daunting task. The public works and utilities department, serving the town of approximately 8,000, set out in 2007 to decrease the municipality’s total water usage by 10% by January 2017, using the amount of water it consumed in 2006 as a baseline.

To meet this goal, town officials knew that they would have to address the water that leaked out of Olds’ water delivery system each year. And in this challenge, Olds is far from alone.

According to information published by energy and water resource management company Itron, more than 32 billion cubic meters of treated water leak from urban water supply systems across the world every year. That is equal to more than $18 billion of non-revenue water.

To continue reading about what has been done in the town of Olds, as well as, what has been done by other utilities click here.

 

Software Strategies – Water-monitoring software and cloud-based storage help boost utilities’ bottom lines.

This article, published by Dan Rafter on July 18, 2017, describes the water-monitoring software used by the Maynilad Water Services, a private water provider in the Philippines.

Software Strategies

Water-monitoring software and cloud-based storage help boost utilities’ bottom lines.

Maynilad Water Services is the largest private water provider in the Philippines, serving a population of 9 million people in the western portion of Manila. The system faced a challenge, though: It needed to make better, and faster decisions on which pipes needed immediate maintenance, which leaks needed to be repaired first, and which meters needed to be replaced.

Maynilad had plenty of data it could turn to in order to help make these decisions. But unfortunately, this data was spread throughout the utility. Water utility workers in the billing department had key data. So did those working in the distribution department. But these numbers were rarely shared. Maynilad needed all its data stored in one, easy-to-access location.

To read the rest of the article follow this link.

What do you think, can this be a possibility in our organization? Would you appreciate such a service? You can leave your comments on our blog page or in the space provided after the full article.

Water Demand Management: Using technology to forecast water usage and improve efficiency

With technology being a big part of our day to day lives it’s seems inevitable that it can be used to solve issues of water usage and improve efficiency. This is highlighted in an article by Lori Lovely in the June 2017 issue of the Water Efficiency magazine.

Do enjoy!

Water Efficiency Magazine
Water Efficiency Magazine June 2017

Water Demand Management

Using technology to forecast water usage and improve efficiency

by Lori Lovely May 25, 2017

 

Mni wiconi is Lakota for “water is life.” The phrase articulates a fundamental truth. Our lives depend on water. Planning to meet and manage demand is essential.

Demand for water has risen relentlessly over the years as the world’s population climbs past the 7 billion mark, with projections of continued growth. Lifestyle affects demand as climate change affects supply.

While demand is easily understood, responding to it involves a complicated set of choices. It can be met with a supply-side response—developing new resources—or a demand-side response—management by influencing demand and water use through more efficient use of water that is already available in order to meet objectives such as economic efficiency, environmental protection, sustainability, or other reasons that could include social equity.

Find the rest of the article here.