EOS Earth and Space Science News – November 2019

The November 2019 issue of the EOS Earth and Space Science News magazine (Volume 100 Issue 11), published by the American Geophysical Union (AGU), is now available for perusal. This issue highlights topics such as natural disasters, safe water, precipitation, climate change, land use, water pollution, as well as, other relevant articles and information from the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

EOS Earth and Space Science News Magazine, November 2019
EOS Earth and Space Science News Magazine, November 2019

Persons wishing to view this magazine can send me an email or visit me at my desk. Happy reading!

 

Extreme Precipitation Expected to Increase with Warming Planet

In a recent article by David Shultz, published in the Earth and Space Science News magazine on the 11th June, 2019,  he discusses a study put forward by Papalexiou and Montanari  in the Water Resources Research Journal, which notes that extreme precipitation is expected to increase due to global warming. Please see the link below for further details.

Source: Extreme Precipitation Expected to Increase with Warming Planet

Half of the World’s Annual Precipitation Falls in Just 12 Days

According to a recent news article released as a press release by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) it has been noted that half of the world’s annual precipitation falls in just twelve days according to global weather stations.

Notably, in light of climate change such precipitation may even be changed further to occur in just eleven days, amplifying flooding and its associated damages.

You can click on the following link to read details of the news article as reported by the Earth and Space Science News Half of the World’s Annual Precipitation Falls in Just 12 Days

You can also read a related article from Nature – The International Journal of Science, which also highlights the annual precipitation as well, on “Why extreme rains are gaining strength as the climate warms”

Responding to Climate Change Deniers with Simple Facts and Logic

With many persons insisting that climate change is not actually taking place, (I’m hoping none of our staff are included in that group, but if you are this article is for you too) this article digitally published by Dork Sahagian on 30 March, 2017, provides five questions and answers that can be used to change the minds of those “climate contrarians” (Sahagian, 2017).

Source: Responding to Climate Change Deniers with Simple Facts and Logic

Sahagian, D. (2017, March 30). Responding to Climate Change Deniers with    Simple Facts and Logic. Retrieved June 02, 2017, from    https://eos.org/editors-vox/responding-to-climate-change-deniers-with-    simple-facts-and-logic

Remote Sensing of the Terrestrial Water Cycle

I have been keeping busy looking at recently published books by publishers (you can browse publisher websites from my homepage menu) and I recently came across this monograph entitled “Remote Sensing of the Terrestrial Water Cycle” edited by Venkat Lakshmi et al..

This book is a product of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Chapman Conference, which was held in February 2012. Chapman conferences are usually “small, topical meetings designed to permit in-depth exploration of specialized subjects in a manner not possible at large meetings” (AGU, 2015).

As such the following information can be found in this monograph:

-An in-depth discussion of the global water cycle
– Approaches to various problems in climate, weather, hydrology, and agriculture
– Applications of satellite remote sensing in measuring precipitation, surface water, snow, soil moisture, groundwater, modeling, and data assimilation
– A description of the use of satellite data for accurately estimating and monitoring the components of the hydrological cycle
– Discussion of the measurement of multiple geophysical variables and properties over different landscapes on a temporal and a regional scale.

Information in this text can be found under the main topics of precipitation, evapotranspiration, surface water, groundwater, data and modeling, soil moisture and snow.

Due to the fact that this document discusses snow, a phenomenon that does not occur in our country, I know that persons may not see it as suitable, however, since it discusses the above topics, I see it as a very comprehensive text. I guess I will do more research and see whether it is a good fit for the agency.

It should be noted that this text is is a valuable resource for students, as well as, research professionals in the hydrology, ecology, atmospheric sciences, geography, and geological sciences communities.

Persons wishing to read up on this document can either click on the link below or search for it on the Wiley website available through my home page in the menu tab. Please note that only registered users can view chapters via PDF.

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Water Cycle

Remote Sensing of the Terrestrial Water Cycle published by Wiley
Remote Sensing of the Terrestrial Water Cycle published by Wiley