Technology That Targets Leaks

Leaks are often a major problem in the water industry since having a leak means that a valuable resource: water is being wasted, and customers’ will not get their regular supply of potable water, as well as, the fact that the surrounding infrastructure will be hampered.

However, in a recent article by Laura Sanchez, in the editor’s blog of the Water Efficiency Magazine, she looks at a robot designed by mechanical engineer You Wu, which is able to detect leaks in pipes even before they have become large enough to be noticed by customers and employees within the water sector, thus ensuring that the problem can be solved sooner rather than later.

“Daisy” as the robot is called also links to mapping software which would allow engineers to know exactly where the leaks are, in order to not to make any costly mistakes.

To read the entire article and make comments you can click on the following link There’s A Robot in Your Pipes…And its Wearing a Skirt

Listening for Leaks

We all know how awful non-revenue water loss is, with customers and the utility experiencing little benefits from water lost through leaks, since it is a precious commodity needed by customers, as well as, the service which the utility is charged to provide.

In the article highlighted below, published by Lori Lovely on February 21, 2018, under the topic of  water in Forester Daily News, as well as, in the Water Efficiency magazine, by Forester Media, one gets detailed information on acoustic leak detection.

Acoustic Leak Detection-
The latest developments to assist in listening for leaks

Leaks are money, states Eric Stacey, product manager for advanced leak detection solutions at Echologics. Money not just down the drain, but right out the drain! Lost water involves costs for treatment and conveyance that never result in revenue, and further expense is incurred in leak detection and pipeline repair.

You can read the rest of the article here, as well as, leave your comments on the topic.

Swimming in Profits, Not Drowning in Losses – Successful leak detection and audit methods

As employees of a public utility we all know the importance of providing customers with a reliable water supply. Yet, due to aged infrastructure, and a lack of funds to remedy this, a lot of water is lost due to leaks and illegal abstraction. In this article by Daniel P. Duffy, from the Water Efficiency Magazine (November – December 2017 Issue) non-revenue water is highlighted, together with, successful leak detection and audit methods.

images
Image Showing Leaking Tap

 

Every drop of clean water is precious. Unfortunately, 30–50% of water is lost through aging infrastructure. And lost water equals lost revenue to the water service supplier. Water is lost through leaks and cracks in pipes and their fit­tings. Since most infrastructure is underground, it is virtually impossible to visually determine the location of these leaks unless the water has reached the surface (causing ponding and sink holes, structural damage, buckling pavement, etc.), and the exact location may be indeterminate. Leak detection requires special technologies that allow inspectors to precisely determine the location and severity of pipeline leaks. This is a field that continues to grow and advance by utilizing both established technology and by adopting emerging methods.

THE IMPORTANCE OF LEAK DETECTION
Water lost through leaks, waste, or simple theft is referred to as non-revenue water, in that it fails to provide revenue to the water supplier because it never reaches its customers. These can be physical losses of water escaping the system, or unaccounted-for water that is not measured due to faulty meters and meters that have been tampered with, poor accounting and bookkeeping, or as a result of human error when reading and recording the water system flow meters. Available and emerging technologies are designed to detect and prevent physical water losses. These will continue over time until they are detected. The accumulation of losses over long durations can result in significant losses even from insignificant leaks. And if water can get out, impurities (soil, bacteria, organics, etc.) can get in and impair the quality of the water, even rendering it unfit to drink.

Continue reading the rest of this article here.

Water Resources Materials Available

Some of the water resources materials that can be accessed through the library are presented below in the image gallery.

Persons interested in viewing any of these documents can send me an email or visit me at my desk.

Software Strategies – Water-monitoring software and cloud-based storage help boost utilities’ bottom lines.

This article, published by Dan Rafter on July 18, 2017, describes the water-monitoring software used by the Maynilad Water Services, a private water provider in the Philippines.

Software Strategies

Water-monitoring software and cloud-based storage help boost utilities’ bottom lines.

Maynilad Water Services is the largest private water provider in the Philippines, serving a population of 9 million people in the western portion of Manila. The system faced a challenge, though: It needed to make better, and faster decisions on which pipes needed immediate maintenance, which leaks needed to be repaired first, and which meters needed to be replaced.

Maynilad had plenty of data it could turn to in order to help make these decisions. But unfortunately, this data was spread throughout the utility. Water utility workers in the billing department had key data. So did those working in the distribution department. But these numbers were rarely shared. Maynilad needed all its data stored in one, easy-to-access location.

To read the rest of the article follow this link.

What do you think, can this be a possibility in our organization? Would you appreciate such a service? You can leave your comments on our blog page or in the space provided after the full article.

Required Reporting for Water Utilities

An article by Laura Sanchez, April 5th 2017, detailing California’s Senate Bill 555, Water Efficiency  Blog. The original can be sourced here.

Water delivery systems leak. Therefore, non-revenue water is an issue concerning all water delivery systems—not only because water lost represents dollars lost, but because it also means the waste of a precious resource.

According to a study by the World Bank, “The total cost to water utilities caused by non-revenue water worldwide can be conservatively estimated at $141 billion per year, with a third of it occurring in the developing world.” Industry estimates put typical system leakage at about 10%. However in developing countries, the report estimates that about 45 million cubic meters are lost from distribution networks daily.

Persons interested in reading the rest of this article can follow this link. Happy reading guys :).