Pharmaceuticals and Affected Wildlife

In a recent article by by Laura Sanchez, published in the editor’s blog of the Water Efficiency Magazine on 14 November, 2018, she highlights a study which noted that wildlife are exposed to high doses of pharmaceutical drugs that are discharged through effluent.

Such an occurrence seems highly alarming, especially when one considers that humans ingest some of these wildlife in their daily diet.

To read the article and comment please click on the following link The Happiest Trout – Water borne pharmaceuticals impact the ecosystem

 

EOS Earth and Space Science News Magazine- June 2018

The newest issue of the AGU’s Earth and Space Science News (Volume 99 No. 6) for June, 2018 is now available for viewing. This issue includes topics such as an early cholera warning system, stratospheric warming effect on the atmosphere, playing and geosciences, oils spill response and risks, United Nations’ 2030 Global Vision, climate models and soil respiration.

 

Earth Space and Science News Magazine June 2018
Earth Space and Science News Magazine June 2018

Persons wishing to view a copy of this magazine can email me or visit me at my desk.

Why Is There So Much Carbon Dioxide in Rivers?

A very interesting article on carbon dioxide in rivers by Sarah Whitman discussing how carbon flows through freshwater bodies which can be applied to pollution and nutrients in the future.

Do enjoy!

Source: Why Is There So Much Carbon Dioxide in Rivers?

Turning data into decisions for environmental protection

A perfect example to show that data is very important to alleviating environmental impacts, which was discussed as a possibility in a previous post. In this instance, data is looked at in terms of  marine resources and coastal management.

caribbeanclimate

Mark Archibald of Antigua and Barbuda Fisheries Division collects data during a dive in The Narrows Mark Archibald of Antigua and Barbuda Fisheries Division collects data during a dive in The Narrows

Eastern Caribbean representatives at the ECMMAN data monitoring workshop in Nevis Eastern Caribbean representatives at the ECMMAN data monitoring workshop in Nevis

People have the power to improve our ocean resources. Understanding the current health of these resources and the needs of those who use them is the first step toward making decisions that protect them for the future. 

Last week in St. Kitts and Nevis, marine biologists, fisheries officers, scientists and natural resource managers from the Eastern Caribbean attended a workshop on marine, socio-economic and management effectiveness data collection methods. Representatives contributed to drafts of their country’s first ever Coral Reef Report Card, which will guide an understanding of the overall health of marine areas and help leaders develop strategies to protect them.

The six-day workshop was part of the Climate-Resilient Eastern Caribbean Marine Managed Areas Network (ECMMAN) project and was hosted by

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Caribbean Strives to Protect Coastal and Marine Ecosystems

caribbeanclimate

Coral colony off the Rosario Islands, Colombia | Photo: EFE Coral colony off the Rosario Islands, Colombia | Photo: EFE

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is partnering with a number of governments as it strives to help boost the resilience of member states to climate change. 

The CARICOM region, with its 15 islands, is considered one of the world’s most important areas of biodiversity. The region is now moving fast towards the sustainable management of both marine areas and coastal resources.

A new partnership between CARICOM and the German government involves the protection of these precious resources from the impacts of climate change.

“Our story is about how we were able to set the boundaries in terms of the fisheries reserve. You realise now as ecotourism, as the product developed, we have more users of the area. We need to protect the reef. We need to protect the fisheries industry,” says Anthony Charles, representative of the Soufriere Marine Management Agency. That body is responsible…

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