EOS Earth and Space Science News – February 2020

The EOS Earth and Space Science News Magazine (Volume 101 No. 2) for February 2020 is now available for perusal. This issue focuses on topics such as climate models, organic carbon, brown algae and soil erosion.

 

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EOS Earth and Space Science News – September 2019

The EOS Earth and Space Science News magazine for September, 2019 (Vol. 100 No. 9), published by the American Geophysical Union (AGU), is available for perusal.

This issue focuses on topics such as climate change, pollution, DDT and Canadian lakes, call for abstracts, fellowships, positions available and other relevant AGU news.

EOS Earth &Space Science News - September 2019
EOS Earth &Space Science News – September 2019

Persons who wish to view this issue can email me or visit me at my desk.

EOS Earth and Space Science News June 2017

A new issue of the Eos Earth, Space and Science magazine (Volume 98 Issue 6) is now available for viewing.

EOS June 2017
Eos Earth and Space Science News Volume 98 Issue 6

This issue highlights topics such as finding career fit, microwave maps and spatial resolution, tracking wildfires with satellite images, freshwater carbon cycle, aerosol effects, fingerprinting tremors and forecasting volcanic eruptions, reducing disaster impacts, topographic imaging and geoscience to name a few.

Persons interested in viewing this magazine can email me or check me at my desk.

EOS Earth and Space Science News Volume 98 Issue 5

A new issue of the EOS – Earth, Space and Science News Magazine (Volume 98 Issue 5) is now available. This issue discusses some relevant topics including coastal wetlands, carbon storage, past floods and flood hazards,  risk assessment, green cities, Radar Method and aquifers, pollution and water quality.

 

EOS Earth, Space and Science News Volume 98 Issue 5
EOS Earth and Space Science News Volume 98 Issue 5

Those who wish to view this issue can email me or check me at my desk. Happy reading guys! 🙂

Global Significance of the Changing Freshwater Carbon Cycle – EOS

By Bopaiah A. Biddanda

Freshwater ecosystems constitute a small fraction of our planet but play a disproportionately large and critical role in the global carbon cycle.

As human activities continue to pump carbon into the atmosphere, the backbone of our understanding of the resulting warming is our knowledge of where that carbon is going: into the atmosphere, into the land, and into bodies of water. When it comes to accounting for the carbon absorbed and emitted by water, the role of inland freshwater may appear quite small compared to the vastness of Earth’s oceans. After all, inland lakes, rivers, streams, reservoirs, wetlands, and estuaries cover less than 4% of Earth’s surface [Downing, 2010; Verpoorter et al., 2014].But recent research shows that the roughly 200 million bodies of inland water play a much larger role in the global carbon cycle than their small footprint suggests. Inland streams and rivers move vast amounts of carbon from the land to the ocean, acting as carbon’s busy transit system.

They also play a disproportionately large role in the global carbon cycle through their high rates of carbon respiration and sequestration [Cole et al., 2007; Tranvik et al., 2009].According to recent estimates, the amount of carbon that inland waters emit is comparable to the net amount of carbon absorbed by living organisms on Earth’s land surface and in its oceans. Moreover, bodies of freshwater bury more carbon in sediments each year than the vast ocean floor [Battin et al., 2009; Aufdenkampe et al., 2011].

Nevertheless, there is great uncertainty in these figures, and scant data exist on continental and global scales. The changing climate is putting freshwater ecosystems at great risk: They are warming at an alarming rate, outpacing warming of the atmosphere and oceans. It’s crucial that scientists dedicate more resources to understanding the global impact of the freshwater continuum on the carbon cycle.

If you would like to read the rest of the article please click here.

Heat in the Place – The Effect of Climate Change on Trinidad and Tobago

An insightful and interesting read from Nolana E. Lynch on the effects of climate change on Trinidad and Tobago.

caribbeanclimate

 Can you feel the heat?

 I don’t think anyone can rightly say that they haven’t been feeling the heat recently. In Trinidad and Tobago, we like to say, “The sun real hot today!” and lately, it seems to have an increasingly unbearable sting to it, making outdoors the preferred place NOT to be, between the hours of 11am and 3pm.

We live on a beautiful tropical island, a few degrees north of the Equator, but we are also a highly industrialized little paradise. Our “cash crop” is oil and gas, and our oil money has funded our nation for more than one and a half centuries. It is quite difficult for us to envision a life without fossil fuels.   We are the heat, having the second highest per capita greenhouse gas emissions in the world, our nation is indeed producing a large amount of carbon, which directly increases temperatures…

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