Deciphering Deluges: New modeling approach reexamines two key assumptions about flooding

For the last century, the U.S. Geological Survey, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and others have collected data on flooding activity to assess damage and help predict future events. Accurately forecasting the frequency and magnitude of flooding events is critical for infrastructure design, environmental management, and disaster preparedness and response.

Although long-term flood records are useful, there may also be large-scale, systematic forces at work that past studies have not adequately captured. For one, traditional prediction methods often assume that flood hydrology is stationary, or, rather, that the magnitude and variability of flood events do not change systematically over time. However, climate change and water management practices could significantly alter the magnitude and variability of extreme flooding events, causing floods to become nonstationary.

Continue to read the article by clicking on the link below.

 

Source: Deciphering Deluges by Sarah Witman (31 August, 2017, Water Resources Research).

Advertisements

About WRLibrarian

Currently employed with the Water and Sewerage Authority at the Water Resources Agency, I have created this blog to provide an online presence for the Agency's library. The purpose of this blog would be to inform staff about library related activities, as well as, relevant information that can have an impact on the Agency's operation.
This entry was posted in Reblogs and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s